www.suzukicycles.org ALL SUZUKI MOTOCYCLES EVER BUILT



Jarmo Haapamäki's solo album SPOILED BY SUCCESS out now
Please support my music career! Buy my CD... Jarmo Haapamäki, the owner and webmaster of this site.
Google
 
WEB WWW.SUZUKICYCLES.ORG



Suzuki GS1000/GS1000E 1977—1980
Suzuki GS1000S 1979—1980
Suzuki GS1000L 1979—1980


I have tried to tell the history of the different Suzuki GS 1000 models on this page the best I know how. I would be grateful of any contributions — sales brochures, magazine ads, magazine articles, pictures, specs, facts, corrections etc. Please scan the material in JPEG format (large enough that all the details are visible) and send them to me. Please tell me the source and the publication date if possible. If you send me pictures of your own bike, please follow these instructions.

Suzuki GS1000 presentation
Surprising everyone, Suzuki Motor Company presented a late prototype of GS1000, their first 1000 cc motorcycle in the Paris motorcycle show, the 64th Salon an der Porte de Versailles, in autumn of 1977. I think the final version of the bike was far more beautiful than the prototype. This photo was published in the Finnish magazine Tekniikan Maailma 19/77. Click to enlarge.


Back in 1977, the manufacturers competed against each other by making larger and more powerful motorcycle engines (sound familiar?) and 1000 was a very respectable number on the side panel. Kawasaki had already released its KZ1000 and Yamaha the powerful XS11. Honda had its GL1000 Gold Wing. Suzuki was the last one of the Japanese ”big four” to join the exclusive ”1000 cc club” with the GS1000.

The GS1000 was based around the successful GS750, which was the lightest of the 750's available at the time. What Suzuki wanted was a simple design, that benefited from solid engineering and light weight. And they succeeded. The GS1000 was only slightly heavier than its smaller brother, which was quite an achievement. By lengthening the stroke of the (relatively short stroke) GS750 engine from 56,4 to 70 mm the cylinder displacement was enlarged from 748 to 997 cc. The lower end of the GS750 was strong enough to cope with the 1 1 liter cylinder displacement but the list of modifications was longer than just adding 14,6 mm to the stroke. The redesigned 750 engine put into the 1000 was actually lighter than the 750 engine! The power output in 1978 was given to 83—90 hp depending of the export country (differences in environment and noise regulations).

Even in other aspects, the GS1000 was in many details based on the GS750, introduced a year earlier. The GS1000 had five speeds, chain drive and tubular steel cradle frame like the GS750, but there's many differences between the models, not just cosmetic (the fuel tank and the design of the rear end of the bike being the most obvious differences). The suspension of the big brother was more advanced, using air and oil dampened front fork.

The GS1000 was arguably the best one-liter four-cylinder of its time.

None of the GS1000 models were sold in its home country, Japan, where selling motorcycles with larger than 750 cc engines was not allowed until 1990, the VX800 roadster being the first model sold in Japan with a piston displacement larger than 750 cc.

Suzuki 1978More Suzuki models from 1978
1978 Suzuki year code: C


The first GS1000s arrived to shops in February 1978. At first the model was called GS1000 (without the E). The first models had conventional rear shocks but in May 1978 they were replaced with gas/air suspension, covered with chromed steel tube.

The final version of the GS1000 differed in couple of details from the pre-launch model, presented in 1977.

Colors: Black, Red, Blue and even Metallic Blue.
'78 GS1000E GS-1000E GS1000 GS-1000GS 1000 1978
Overall Length: 2 340 mm (92.1 in)
Overall Width: 755 mm (29.7 in)
Overall Height: 1 145 mm (45.1 in)
Wheelbase: 1 505 mm (59.3 in)
Dry Weight: 233 kg (507 lbs)
Engine type: Air-cooled 997 cc inline-4, DOHC, 8 valves. 90 ps (66 kW)/ 8.200 rpm, 78 Nm (8,5 kg-m)/ 6.500 rpm.

Click on the image for larger format.
'78 GS1000E GS-1000E GS1000 GS-1000GS 1000 1978
Overall Length: 2 340 mm (92.1 in)
Overall Width: 755 mm (29.7 in)
Overall Height: 1 145 mm (45.1 in)
Wheelbase: 1 505 mm (59.3 in)
Dry Weight: 233 kg (507 lbs)
Engine type: Air-cooled 997 cc inline-4, DOHC, 8 valves. 90 ps (66 kW)/ 8.200 rpm, 78 Nm (8,5 kg-m)/ 6.500 rpm.

Click on the image for larger format.
'78 GS1000E GS-1000E GS1000 GS-1000GS 1000 E 1978
Overall Length: 2 340 mm (92.1 in)
Overall Width: 755 mm (29.7 in)
Overall Height: 1 145 mm (45.1 in)
Wheelbase: 1 505 mm (59.3 in)
Dry Weight: 233 kg (507 lbs)
Engine type: Air-cooled 997 cc inline-4, DOHC, 8 valves. 90 ps (66 kW)/ 8.200 rpm, 78 Nm (8,5 kg-m)/ 6.500 rpm.

Click on the image for larger format.
'78 GS1000E GS-1000E GS1000 GS-1000GS 1000 E 1978
Overall Length: 2 340 mm (92.1 in)
Overall Width: 755 mm (29.7 in)
Overall Height: 1 145 mm (45.1 in)
Wheelbase: 1 505 mm (59.3 in)
Dry Weight: 233 kg (507 lbs)
Engine type: Air-cooled 997 cc inline-4, DOHC, 8 valves. 90 ps (66 kW)/ 8.200 rpm, 78 Nm (8,5 kg-m)/ 6.500 rpm.

Click on the image for larger format.


Suzuki 1979More Suzuki models from 1979
1978 Suzuki year code: N
'78 GS1000E GS-1000E GS1000 GS-1000GS 1000 E 1979
Overall Length: 2 340 mm (92.1 in)
Overall Width: 755 mm (29.7 in)
Overall Height: 1 145 mm (45.1 in)
Wheelbase: 1 505 mm (59.3 in)
Dry Weight: 233 kg (507 lbs)
Engine type: Air-cooled 997 cc inline-4, DOHC, 8 valves. 90 ps (66 kW)/ 8.000 rpm, 80 Nm (8,75 kg-m)/ 6.500 rpm.

Click on the image for larger format.


A letter ”S” after a Suzuki model name normally means that the engineers have basically mounted a cockpit (bikini) fairing to the bike to make it (look) more sporty. That's even the case with the GS1000S. I believe it was the first standard Suzuki sold with a fairing.

GS1000S was based on the GS1000E but didn't have its pneumatic rear suspension. The fairing gained the bike's weight with 5 kg (11 lbs) and included a clock and oil temperature gauge on the instrument panel. The rear wheel diameter was increased from 17 to 18 inches on the S model.

Apparently the German version of the GS1000S did have the pneumatic rear suspension and had a 17-inch rear wheel. Slightly different bikes were sold in different parts of the world.

The GS1000S is also known as the Wes Cooley replica. The GS series worked well on the track, too, Wes Cooley and Yoshimura winning the young AMA Superbike Championship for Suzuki in the late seventies. The Suzuki GS1000S actually homologated the fairing for race use in the AMA Superbike class. It was very fast bike, being one of the absolute fastest motorcycles in the world. In today's standards, the model was a suicide machine with poor high speed stability but back in 1979 it handled as well as its competitors.

The beautiful GS1000S was manufactured under two years, 1980 being the last model year for the GS1000S. Then the GSX1100S Katana took its place being the fastest and sportiest Suzuki motorcycle. Apparently the nickname ”Wes Cooley replica” came some time after the model was released and the model was never officially known as the Wes Cooley replica by Suzuki. Apparently the GS1000S started being called that after Kawasaki released their Eddie Lawson replica years later (source: Daniel Kaplan, USA).

The GS1000S was available in color combinations Blue/White and Red/White.

'79 GS-1000 S Wes CooleySuzuki GS1000S 1979
a.k.a. Wes Cooley replica
Overall Length: 2 220 mm (87.4 in)
Overall Width: 775 mm (30.5 in)
Overall Height: 1 250 mm (49.2 in)
Wheelbase: 1 505 mm (59.3 in)
Dry Weight: 238 kg (524 lbs)
Engine type: Air-cooled 997 cc inline-4, DOHC, 8 valves. 90 ps (66 kW)/ 8.200 rpm, 78 Nm (8,5 kg-m)/ 6.500 rpm.

Click on the image for larger format.

'79 GS1000SSuzuki GS 1000 S 1979
a.k.a. Wes Cooley replica
Overall Length: 2 220 mm (87.4 in)
Overall Width: 775 mm (30.5 in)
Overall Height: 1 250 mm (49.2 in)
Wheelbase: 1 505 mm (59.3 in)
Dry Weight: 238 kg (524 lbs)
Engine type: Air-cooled 997 cc inline-4, DOHC, 8 valves. 90 ps (66 kW)/ 8.200 rpm, 78 Nm (8,5 kg-m)/ 6.500 rpm.

Click on the image for larger format.


In 1979 Suzuki introduced even a custom version of the GS1000E called GS1000L. It had same mechanics as the GS1000G but had high handlebars, stepped seat, leading axle front fork, smaller fuel tank (15 l/ 4.0 US gal) and short cut silencers. 19-inch wheels.

The GS1000L was manufactured between 1979 and 1981.
'78 GS1000E GS-1000E GS1000 GS-1000GS1000L 1979
Overall Length:
Overall Width:
Overall Height:
Seat Height: 825 mm (32.5 in)
Wheelbase: 1 525 mm (60.0 in)
Ground Clearance: 155 mm (6.1 in)
Dry Weight: 240 kg (529 lbs)
Engine type: Air-cooled 997 cc inline-4, DOHC, 8 valves. 90 ps (66 kW)/ 8.500 rpm, 8,0 kg-m/ 7.500 rpm.

Click on the image for larger format.
Here's even larger picture.

Another version of the GS1000 released in 1979 was the Italian Bimota Suzuki SB3 using the same power plant.



1980 (actually a 1979? See the text above) GS1000S, the German model with 17-ich rear wheel. Scanned from the official German Suzuki sales brochure.


Suzuki GS 1000 S

1980 GS1000S, found at Classic Bikes' (UK) website. Click to enlarge. This bike has the 1980 model's slotted brake discs and the stepped seat but the longer exhaust pipe (see the text below).

GS1000S Mini-Replica


Suzuki 1980More Suzuki models from 1980
1980 Suzuki year code: T

(March 80) GS1000ET Replaces the GS1000EC with alloy finished engine and chrome exhausts, electric starter.     
.
'78 GS1000E GS-1000E GS1000 GS-1000GS1000ET 1980
Overall Length: 2 340 mm (92.1 in)
Overall Width: 755 mm (29.7 in)
Overall Height: 1 145 mm (45.1 in)
Wheelbase: 1 505 mm (59.3 in)
Dry Weight: 233 kg (507 lbs)
Engine type: Air-cooled 997 cc inline-4, DOHC, 8 valves. 90 ps (66 kW)/ 8.500 rpm, 78 Nm (8,5 kg-m)/ 7.500 rpm.

Click on the image for larger format.

I told you before on this page that the 1980-year's model of the GS1000S was no different from the 1979-year's model. I was wrong. A reader from USA corrected me on this and told me that there are several differences. (Thanks, Rick!)
.
Here are a few of the upgrades, right out of the work shop manual: vacuum petcock, CV carbs, maintenance-free transistorized ignition, new (rectangular) res cap (front brake) 4-screws, slotted front brake discs and redesigned caliper, 1/2 (rear-set) foot pegs, stepped seat and shorter exhaust megaphones (end at rear axle), off-set brake and clutch levers.
.
Apparently I have shown the original 1979-year's model on several pages as a 1980. I looked up why, and found out that in several countries the originally 1979-year's model has been sold as a 1980. It seems like the revisited 1980-year's model couldn't be purchased in all countries. The scan from the German 1980 catalogue (above) is an example of that. Again, the upgraded model seems to be that rare that I haven't been able to find any official pictures of it. can you help me with that?
.
Another reader, Bryan, told me about the GS1000 series sold in Australia. Sometimes bikes sold in different countries had slightly different specs, so this may only apply to Australian models, though the factory service manual says this is common to all S models:
.
The '79 'SN' series GS1000 had the full plastic dash with oil temp and fuel gauges and ran 28mm Mikuni slide carburettors. The '80 'ST' series looked the same but only had a speedo/tacho binnacle with a fuel gauge in one of the instruments, not the full plastic dash. The 1980-year's model also had 30mm Mikuni slide carbs, as well as bigger camshafts with about half a millimetre more lift and longer valve duration. “To my knowledge, that model was the only GS1000 to ever benefit from the larger camshafts and slide carburettors, and definitely made more horsepower than the previous model. In straight line accelleration tests between my friend and I, his ST was consistently faster than my SN, despite him being a heavier guy than me,” Bryan added.
.
Another reader, Craig Hutchinson from USA, wanted to add some info: The '80 model differed in some significant ways. In addition to the areas already noted, the cams were significantly more radical for 1980. The carbs were Mikuni 36mm CV units. The alloy wheels were added (all the 79 models I have seen had spoke wheels) but they were still tube type. Tubeless were not common until '81.

1979 GS1000S cockpit view.

Bryan continues: “Canadian bikes were restricted to 26mm slide carbs to meet the tighter emission regulations. This part may be peculiar to Australia, but over here the '79 models were all blue and white while the '80 models were all red and white, so here bikers just refer to them as 'blue and white' or 'red and white' GS1000s.”

Here's
an interesting Japanese web page (translated to English) with pictures of the Wes Cooley replica model bike, that will say a small plastic one, not a real bike.

'79 GS1000SSuzuki GS 1000 S 1980
a.k.a. Wes Cooley replica
Overall Length: 2 220 mm (87.4 in)
Overall Width: 775 mm (30.5 in)
Overall Height: 1 250 mm (49.2 in)
Wheelbase: 1 505 mm (59.3 in)
Dry Weight: 238 kg (524 lbs)
Engine type: Air-cooled 997 cc inline-4, DOHC, 8 valves. 90 ps (66 kW)/ 8.200 rpm, 78 Nm (8,5 kg-m)/ 6.500 rpm.

Click on the image for larger format.


A shaft-driven heavyweight touring bike, GS1000G, fitted with a 22 liter (5.8 US gal) fuel tank was introduced in May 1980 as a 1980 year's model (GS1000GT). Except for cosmetic differences and the shaft drive, the GS1000G shared the mechanics with the rest of the GS1000 model family. Manufactured between 1980 and 1982.

Here's more GS1000G info.


No changes were made to the 1980 year's GS1000L. However, Suzuki introduced another shaftie in 1980 fitting a shaft drive the GS1000L. GS1000GL used the same mechanics as the GS1000G but borrowed the style of the GS1000L with smaller fuel tank, high handlebars and stepped seat.

GS1000GL was manufactured between 1980 and 1982.
'78 GS1000E GS-1000E GS1000 GS-1000GS 1000 L 1980
Overall Length:
Overall Width:
Overall Height:
Seat Height: 825 mm (32.5 in)
Wheelbase: 1 525 mm (60.0 in)
Ground Clearance: 155 mm (6.1 in)
Dry Weight: 240 kg (529 lbs)
Engine type: Air-cooled 997 cc inline-4, DOHC, 8 valves. 90 ps (66 kW)/ 8.500 rpm, 8,0 kg-m/ 7.500 rpm.

Click on the image for larger format.
Here's even larger picture.



1980 GS1000E, found at Classic Bikes' (UK) website.



Suzuki 1981More Suzuki models from 1981
1981 Suzuki year code: X

The shaft-driven model being the only one liter GS model with an eight-valve engine, the GS1000GX was introduced in January 1981. Some minor modifications: new-designed seat, influenced by the custom model (GS1000L) and especially the '77 pre-launch GS1000 seats and black rectangular indicator heads instead of chromed ones.

Here are some GS1000G magazine ads.





More: Suzuki GS1000S brochures & adverts

More: Suzuki GS1000G models

More: Suzuki GS models

More: All Suzuki models


Sources: Ron Hurd's Website (the red '81 GS1000G is his bike), several Japanese websites (can't read or write their names), Michael's GS Classic, Tekniikan Maailma, PartsPartners.com, The Red Book, American Suzuki Motor Corporation, Veikko Orpana etc.

This free site is managed by Jarmo Haapamäki.
If you find this site helpful, please leave a donation for Jarmo
so you can enjoy the spirit of giving too.


Came here from a search engine?
Click at the home button below to get to the main page with frames.

HOME   FAQ
Web shopping






CMS-Japanese Motorcycle Supply Parts

Great Selection & Great Prices on Street Helmets




Google
 
WEB WWW.SUZUKICYCLES.ORG

Free Online Metric Calculator

A web page that helps to convert volume (capacity), weight, length, area and temperature, power and energy measures between U.S./Imperial and SI (Metric) units.